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Security

twofactorWe’ve obviously chatted about passwords and passphrases and tips for managing too many passwords. Obviously, strong passwords are very important in protecting your online accounts, but there is an additional way you can protect many of your accounts: two-factor authentication. What is it and why should you use it? Read on for all the details.

seccompRansomware, a type of malware that encrypts data on infected systems, has become a lucrative option for cyber extortionists. When the malware is run, it locks victim’s files and allows criminals to demand payment to release them.

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you are probably well aware that ransomware is a hot topic in the news these days. Organizations of all types and sizes have been impacted, but small businesses can be particularly vulnerable to attacks. And ransomware is on the rise. In a recent study conducted by security software vendor McAfee Labs, researchers identified more than 4 million samples of ransomware in Q2 of 2015, including 1.2 million new samples. That compares with fewer than 1.5 million total samples in Q3 of 2013 (400,000 new). Ransomware is distributed in a variety of ways and is difficult to protect against because, just like the flu virus, it is constantly evolving.

There are ways to protect your business against ransomware attacks. In this e-book you’ll learn how the malware is spread, the different types of ransomware proliferating today, and what you can do to avoid or recover from an attack. Hiding your head in the sand won’t work, because today’s ransom seekers play dirty. Make sure your organization is prepared with our ransomware guide for your business.

Have You Signed BAAs with your Vendors?

Posted by on in Security

healthcareIT2If you are a HIPAA-regulated business or deal with HIPAA-regulated industries, you really have to trust your vendors. A security breach at a vendor’s office may as well be a breach in your office, as far as HIPAA is concerned. You need to have a business-associate agreement (BAA) signed with those vendors. And if that vendor has no idea what a BAA is, you might want to reconsider your relationship with them, for your own protection. In a recent news story, an Illinois-based clinic was fined $31,000 because they didn’t have a BAA signed with a vendor hired to store paper records containing patients’ protected health information (PHI) (that vendor is the focus of other investigations). You can read the full cautionary tale here. If you need any assistance with your vendors or other HIPAA regulations, don’t hesitate to contact your local Weston office today.

SecurityIn a scary headline for the day, a new strain of malware is spreading by Microsoft Word files that is platform agnostic: It targets both Microsoft Windows and Apple Mac OS X in the same file. It’s a macro/VBA-embedded Word document that when opened and macros enabled will download additional files off the internet to cause its pain. You can see a more technical writeup over here.

We’ve said it before: Macro-enabled Word documents are bad news and should be avoided. Get some good email protectioncontent filtering and good anti-virus to help prevent this stuff from getting to your network in the first place. But if it does get there, make sure you can recognize and toss it out before it becomes an issue.

Tagged in: Security Virus

seccompA recent study from Intermedia found 93 percent of employees engage in at least one form of poor data security. And 23 percent of respondents admitted they would take data from their company if it would benefit them. Long story short, you can have all the technology security in the world, but your biggest vulnerability lies in your people – from regular employees up to managers and owners. What are some of the issues that researchers found?